Patients – Medplex
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We will do our best to schedule you on or near your preferred date and time.

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(205) 453-0314 Phone
Mon: 8AM - 5PM | Tues-Thurs: 7:30AM - 5PM Friday: 8am-12pm Staff Only
medplexpediatricdentistry@yahoo.com Email
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Patients

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Online Patient Questionnaire

We are asking you to complete new patient questionnaire enabling our clinical and administrative staff to prepare for your first visit and to make your check-in for your appointment quicker and easier.

Our questionnaire consists of 4 documents. To complete a document, simply fill out the fields with the requested information. While most of the fields are optional, certain fields, marked by asterisks, must be completed. When you have completed a document please review your entry, click the Submit button to move to the next document. Please don’t use your browser’s Back or Forward buttons. Use of these buttons may ‘undo’/’redo’ your recent actions and may result in errors.

Please note that the information you will submit will be encrypted for your protection and goes directly to our office. We appreciate the time that you will spend providing the information helping us prepare for your visit.

Thank you and please call our office (205) 453-0314 or email to medplexpediatricdentistry@yahoo.com if you have any questions.

Continue to our Patient Questionnaire

First Visit

New parents have plenty to worry about: making sure their baby is healthy and happy, re-arranging their lives around hectic schedules and lost sleep, and figuring out what to do in all sorts of novel situations. When it comes to your child’s oral health, though, there’s plenty of help available. It all begins at our office, when you bring your youngster in for his or her first visit to the dentist.

When will we meet your child? According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, a child’s first checkup should occur by age one. Surprised? You shouldn’t be! Even though there may only be a few baby teeth visible at that age, there are plenty of things we can start working on — including the development of healthy habits that will make future visits to the dentist far more pleasurable.

Unfortunately, some kids develop tooth decay at an early age. We will be on the lookout for cavities — but that’s only one reason for an early visit to our office. Equally important is reviewing the proper ways to care for a young child’s mouth, going over your child’s developmental milestones, and discussing the importance of good oral hygiene.

Preparing for the Big Day

The way kids seem to pick up on their parents’ feelings sometimes seems uncanny; so, if you’re nervous about going to the dentist yourself, try not to let it show. Generally, during this visit we’ll simply be talking to you and your child, looking in his or her mouth, and making oral health assessments. It’s best to tell your child what to expect beforehand, without making too big a fuss about it. You could even build some excitement by helping them get ready for “the big day.”

When you come in, it’s a good idea to bring a comforting toy, a snack, and an extra diaper or two, just in case of fussiness. If possible, leave other kids at home, so we can concentrate on the new patient — but if you can bring another adult along, it may free your attention to focus on your child’s oral health. Likewise, filling out forms in advance may save time and effort on the day of the visit.

The Checkup

When you and your child are comfortably seated in the office, we’ll spend a few minutes getting to know each other and explaining what we will be doing. Then, we’ll perform a gentle examination of the mouth. We will be looking for any early signs of dental problems such as tooth decay, and assessing the risk that your child may develop the disease in the future. Often, this kind of risk assessment can help us prevent — and even reverse — the early stages of tooth decay, without any drilling.

Finally, we’ll discuss various ways to keep your child’s oral health in top condition. For instance, we may talk about how diet, eating habits and oral hygiene practices can help prevent tooth decay, the most common chronic disease of childhood. That’s an important subject for everyone — even more so if your child is at greater risk. If any treatments (such as fluoride) are needed, we will explain what they are and why we recommend them. We will also review tips on cleaning and brushing effectively, and we’ll schedule a follow-up visit as required.

Many habits are developed early in life. That’s why it’s important to “get it done by age one.” So when it’s time for your child’s first visit… don’t hesitate! You’ll be glad you came in.

What are Baker Buck$?

Dr. Baker Buck$ are a cool way to earn chances to win a prize that is drawn for monthly. Each Buck represents a chance to win the monthly prize. So the more Buck$ you earn, the better your chances are at winning!

How can I earn Dr. Baker Buck$?

You can earn Dr. Baker Buck$ in the following ways:

  • Wear your Medplex Pediatric Dentistry T-shirt to your appointment (2 Buck$)
  • Refer a friend to see Dr. Baker (2 Buck$)
  • Bring in your awesome report card with all A’s and B’s
  • Receive a Dr. Baker Buck if you are a new patient
  • Be a No Cavity Club Member

Dr. Chambliss Answers Your Questions

Dr. Baker Chambliss is always happy to answer any questions that parents may have when it comes to our pediatric dentistry. We understand that your child might be nervous when visiting the dentist, which is why we are happy to provide options such as sedation dentistry. We also offer many other treatments such as customized mouth guards, dental sealants and space maintainers. If you are in the Birmingham, Hoover, Alabaster or Helena area and in search of a caring and professional pediatric dentist, we encourage you to schedule a consultation!

Why should my child see a pediatric dentist instead of our regular family dentist?

Pediatric dentistry is a dental specialty that focuses on the oral health of young people. Following dental school, a pediatric dentist has two to three years additional specialty training in the unique needs of infants, children and adolescents, including those with special health needs. In addition, our office is completely designed for and focused on children.

At what age should my child have his/her first dental visit?

“First visit by 1st birthday” is the general rule. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend the first dental visit to take place by the child’s first birthday. To prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears – usually between 6 and 12 months of age – and certainly no later than his/her 1st birthday.

How should I clean my baby's teeth?

A toothbrush with soft bristles and a small head, especially one designed for infants, is the best choice for babies. Brushing at least once a day, at bedtime, will remove plaque bacteria that can lead to decay.

What is baby bottle tooth decay, and how can I prevent it?

Baby bottle tooth decay is a pattern of rapid decay associated with prolonged nursing. It happens when a child goes to sleep while breast-feeding and/or bottle-feeding. During sleep, the flow of saliva is reduced, and the natural self-cleansing action of the mouth is diminished. Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bedtime bottle.

How can I help my child through the teething stage?

When teeth erupt, sore gums are part of the normal eruption process. The discomfort is eased for some children by use of a teething biscuit, a piece of toast or a frozen teething ring. Your pharmacy should also have medications that can be rubbed on the gums to alleviate the discomfort.

Can thumb sucking be harmful for my child's teeth?

Thumb and pacifier sucking habits that go on for a long period of time can create crowded, crooked teeth or bite problems. If children are still sucking their thumbs or fingers when their permanent teeth erupt, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your pediatric dentist. Most children stop these habits on their own.

When should my child start using toothpaste?

Do not use fluoridated toothpaste on children until your child can safely spit the toothpaste out after brushing. Earlier than that, clean your child’s teeth with water and a soft-bristled toothbrush or a safe to swallow tooth and gum cleaner. Parents should brush for their child or supervise brushing until their child has the proper dexterity to brush their teeth effectively. Use no more than a pea-sized amount of toothpaste, and make sure children do not swallow excess toothpaste.

If my child gets a toothache, what should I do?

To comfort your child, rinse his/her mouth with warm salt water, and apply a cold compress or ice wrapped in a cloth on your child’s face if it is swollen. Do not put heat or aspirin on the sore area, but you may give the child acetaminophen for pain. Please contact us as soon as possible.

My child plays sports. How should I protect my child's teeth?

A mouth guard should be a top priority on your child’s list of sports equipment. Athletic mouth protectors, or mouth guards, are made of soft plastic and fit comfortably to the shape of the upper teeth. They protect a child’s teeth, lips, cheeks and gums from sports-related injuries. Any mouth guard works better than no mouth guard, but a custom-fitted mouth guard fitted by our dentist is your child’s best protection against sports-related injuries.

If my child gets a cavity in a baby tooth, should it still be filled?

Primary, or “baby,” teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt. Some of them are necessary until a child is 12 years old or older. Pain, infection of the gums and jaws, impairment of general health and premature loss of teeth are just a few of the problems that can happen when baby teeth are neglected. Also, because tooth decay is really an infection and will spread, decay on baby teeth can cause decay on permanent teeth. Proper care of baby teeth is instrumental in enhancing the health of your child.

What should I do if my child knocks out a permanent tooth?

First of all, remain calm. If possible, find the tooth and hold it by the crown (top) rather than the root. Replace the tooth in the socket, and hold it there with clean gauze or a washcloth. If you can’t put the tooth back in the socket, place the tooth in a clean container with milk or water, and take your child and the glass immediately to the pediatric dentist. Time is essential, so the faster you act, the better your chances of saving the tooth.

Contact Us For More Information!

Should you have more questions about pediatric dentistry please do not hesitate to visit the remainder of our website or contact us. Dr. Baker Chambliss and his team are always willing to answer your questions. Whether your question be about our Doctor, treatments or simply wish to book an appointment for your child please contact us. We look forward to welcoming you into the Medplex Pediatric Dentistry family!

Appointment Request

A staff member from Medplex Pediatric Dentistry will contact you regarding your appointment request shortly. If you are unable to confirm your request via text or phone with our staff within 24 hours, we will not be able to hold your reserved date and time. We look forward to serving you!

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1
Patient Nameyour full name
New Patient
Addressfull address
Phone Number

We will do our best to schedule you on or near your preferred date and time.

Preferred Daysof appointment
Reason for appointmentmore details
Reason for appointment
 
0 /
Previous
Next